Our town library is on the second level of the building. The building is on the register of historical places, but houses City Hall, City Court as well as Commission Meetings, etc... on the first floor. When we asked if they would install an elevator so those of us with disabilities could have access, we were told they didn't have to comply because the building was on the register of historical places and it would alter the building. Should this be a relevent excuse to prevent us from having access. Our town is small and a lot of us miss the opportunity to attend functions that take place in the library such as computer access and classes, guest authors for book signings, wildlife speakers with live specimens to study, etc.... All of which we would love to be able to attend. If I need a book or need to research something, instead of driving 4 blocks to our local library, I have to drive about 15 miles to the next city and use their library.

The same is said for our railroad depot. The top floor is part of a museum but for those not able to climb steps, they will never know all the interesting items up there to enjoy. I'm not trying to stir up trouble of any kind, but until you have disabilities that prevent you from doing things you have always done, you will never fully.

understand what being "left out" feels like.

Marian Quinn Burgess

Originally posted as a comment to an article. Find the original post here: www.facilitiesnet.com/.../Avoiding-ADA-Lawsuits--10433